Lesson 7A - Thought Groups - English Pronunciation


Do you have a favorite finger, I myself cannot sing very well? So there are many singers, I admire from Frank Sinatra to Steve Perry from Ella Fitzgerald to Celine Dion. One thing all of these singers have in common is that they know how to breathe properly when we speak it's, not unlike when we sing there are natural places to pause and take a breath. It is not possible to sing a whole song in one breath. And it is not natural to say long sentences in one breath in this lesson we're going to talk.

About something called thought groups, I'm going to explain how we group our words into thoughts. If you group your words, naturally, there will be a better flow to your speech, and it will be easier for people to understand. You let's, try an exercise I'm going to read a text, two different ways. The first time I'm going to read with unnatural pausing. The second time I will read it with thought groups.

And there will be a better flow to my reading I want you to listen carefully to the difference reading. One when I was a girl I skipped down paths danced in my bedroom, spun in circles, under the sky jumped rope with my friends and squatted to smell flowers in my mother's garden reading to when I was a girl I skipped down paths danced in my bedroom, spun in circles, under the sky jumped rope with my friends and squatted to smell flowers and my mother's garden. So what exactly made the difference between those two readings?

How did I form the thought groups? And the second one difference between. Writing and speaking is that in writing, we use punctuation. So when we read aloud the writers' punctuation tells us where to pause, for example, we pause, add a comma a period, a semicolon and a colon. We also pause when there are parentheses here's, an example of an oral reading when I was a boy I leaped over fences.

When I was a young man, I hopped into my father's car in this text, the periods and commas told me where to pause, often we pause a bit longer at commas than we do at periods. So I use a double. Slash at the period in a single, slash at the comma in this lesson I'll use these slashes to indicate pauses is punctuation. Our only guide informing thought groups, no there's also grammar. So our two keys to identifying thought groups or punctuation and grammar. So when you're speaking, and you're, not able to look at punctuation, let grammar guide you sentences are made up of grammatical units, identify those units, and you'll know where to pause between larger grammatical units creates a.

Natural rhythm and more fluid speech, what kinds of grammatical units? Am I talking about well, the first kind or noun, phrases, for example, a beautiful woman, it is not natural to separate? These three words, they represent a single idea, a thought group. So an article an adjective and a noun must be pronounced in one breath, noun. Phrases can be the subjects of our sentences, but let's look at sentences one and two in the first a single noun phrase is our subject, a beautiful woman. So if we're going to.

Pause at all in this sentence, we can pause after the subject, and before the predicate, a beautiful woman entered the room. But in sentence 2, the subject is a bit longer again, grammar is our guide, and we're dealing with a compound subject, meaning, there's, two, so it's possible to pause after woman and before dog and still sound natural a beautiful woman and her little dog entered the room verb. Phrases are another kind of grammatical unit. For example, ran blissfully. We don't separate a verb from an. Adverb climbed tall trees.

We don't separate a verb from an object had been dancing. We don't separate auxiliary verbs from a main verb here are two more grammatical units, prepositional, phrases, for example, with my friends and clauses. The first example of a clause is an adverb clause, an adverb clause of time. When I was a boy I leaped over fences in sentence. Two we have an adjective clause. The boy who was no older than six or seven leaped over a fence again. These grammatical units represent ideas.

Thought groups, and we don't want to break up these ideas, be careful, although grammar is our guide and forming thought groups it. Doesn't mean that every sentence has to be broken up in grammatical units. We don't break up short statements examples, Iran who jumped did you dance, it's, Jennifer's composition. It would not be natural to pause in these short statements. We'd only pause at the very end before the next statement, here's, some more advice and forming thought groups punctuation and grammar are. Your guides, but in general, you simply don't want to break up words that form a single idea if you need to speak slower for your listeners for any reason break sentences into shorter thought, groups, exercise 1, identify thought groups in each statement example, read the statement to yourself and decide where to pause I would read the statement as follows when I was a mother I tripped over toys on the floor and rocked my children in my arms it's also possible to pause after toys. And after children as.

I stated before if you need to speak slower for any reason you would break long sentences into shorter thought groups. So the alternative reading for this statement is when I was a mother I tripped over toys on the floor and rocked my children in my arms. Once I would read the statement as follows now that I am a grandmother. I tap, my feet as I wait for my grandchildren to visit me, too I would read the statement as follows when I became a man I fell at the feet of a beautiful woman.

Dated : 11-Apr-2022

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